Tag Archives: disk covers

ladung51

Swedish 1980s C64 Stuff

Today, we give you some stickers, disk covers, and paper notes which hedning managed to secure from the collection of Zeta, a cracker, coder and musician who was active in the Swedish C64 scene in the late 1980s. Some well-known and some less-known names from the Scandinavian and international scene. Enjoy!

Disk covers:
• 2000 Volt disk cover, 1988 [metadata]
• Four Danish Dream Line disk covers, 1988 [metadata cover 1, 2, 3, 4]
• Digital Crackers disk cover, 1988 [metadata]
• Flash disk cover, 1988 [metadata]
• Gilbert Turbo Cracker disk cover, 1988 [metadata]
• M.U.S.I.C. disk cover, 1988 [metadata]
• The Digital Force disk cover, 1988 [metadata]

Stickers:
• Spemu/Finnish Gold sticker, 1980s [metadata]
• Zargon sticker, 1980s [metadata]

Letters:
• Creator/Strike Force (Germany) to Zeta, 1988 [metadata]
• Euratom (Germany) to Zeta, 1987 [metadata]
• Mr Lead/CPU (Sweden) to Zeta, 20 May 1988 [metadata]
• Mr Lead/CPU (Sweden) to Zeta, 9 June 1988 [metadata]
• Mr Lead/CPU (Sweden) to Zeta, 4 July 1988 [metadata]
• Nrj/New Aces (France) to Zeta, 1988 [metadata]
• Spirit/2000 Volt (Sweden) to Zeta, 1988 [metadata]

ladung43

C64 Disk Covers from Hedning

Here we go with another contribution by Hedning/G*P: several C64 disk sleeves from the early to mid-1990s, plus a quite peculiar bonus – a chocolate wrapper produced by two C64 demo groups.

Atlantis & F4CG chocolate wrapper, 2014 [metadata]
Black Code Design disk cover by Big Boost, 1994 [metadata]
Black Duke disk cover, 1992 [metadata]
Booze Design disk cover by HCL, 1990s [metadata]
Coma Light 12 disk cover by Bizkid, 1994 [metadata]
F4CG disk cover by Flash, 1996 [metadata]
F4CG disk cover by FX, 1990s [metadata]
F4CG disk cover by Zapotek, 1995 [metadata]
Genesis Project disk cover by Tronic, 1990s [metadata]
Jazzgossen Prv. disk cover by Trident, 1997 [metadata]
Rock ‘n Role 21 disk cover by Kirk, 1996 [metadata]
Skyhigh 10 disk cover by Earthquake, 1994 [metadata]
Skyhigh 20 disk cover by Junkie, 1995 [metadata]
Triage disk cover by Chaotic, 1996 [metadata]
Visuality 3 disk cover by Mick, 1993 [metadata]
Warriors of Time disk cover by Brady, 1990 [metadata]
Wonderland 9 disk cover by Guran, 1991 [metadata]
X-Rated disk cover by The Beast, 1990s [metadata]

ladung33

C64 Disk Covers (Fzool Collection #4)

Here we go with the final instalment of Fzool‘s disk cover collection. It features 31 disk sleeves in a broad range of styles, from naïve to sophisticated, from fantasy to science fiction to erotica, from heavy metal to graffiti… It gives a good overview of disk covers that were produced in the 1990s, when swapping on the C64 slowly became less important, and disk covers turned from a necessity into an art of its own. Enjoy!

Also Animals Can Be Cruel disk cover by Junkie, 1998 [metadata]
Authority disk cover by Serio, 1998 [metadata]
F4CG disk cover by Sin-1, 1998 [metadata]
F4CG disk cover by Zapotek, 1997 [metadata]
High-Tech disk cover by Jak T Rip, 1995 [metadata]
Ingenious Brain #5 disk cover by Mr. Friese, 1994 [metadata]
Killing Technology disk cover by Astaroth, 1994 [metadata]
Leming disk cover by Poison, 1998 [metadata]
Mad+Bad Group disk cover by Jonn Donn, 1997 [metadata]
Mail Madness disk cover by Neelix, 1997 [metadata]
New York Tokyo disk cover by Pixelpunk, 2002 [metadata]
Padua disk cover by Zapotek, 1998 [metadata]
Relax Magazine disk cover by Zapotek, 1998 [metadata]
Resource disk cover by Splash, 1997 [metadata]
Rock ‘n Role disk cover by Kirk, 1990s [metadata]
ROLE disk cover by Almighty God, 1998 [metadata]
ROLE disk cover by Aza, 1998 [metadata]
Stiff disk cover by Serio, 1997 [metadata]
The Factory disk cover by Micro, 1997 [metadata]
The Fist And The Brain disk cover by Lizart, 1997 [metadata]
Tiger-Disk disk cover by Brainsmasher, 1999 [metadata]
Tiger-Disk disk cover by DonAlt, 1990s [metadata]
Tiron disk cover by Skopi, 1995 [metadata]
Trip 2 Nowhere disk cover by Sundance, 1998 [metadata]
Ultimat(iv)e Stains disk cover, 1998 [metadata]
Vandalism News disk cover by Serio, 1998 [metadata]
Vitality #4 disk cover by Dr. Soft, 1994 [metadata]
Vitality #6 disk cover by Dr. Soft, 1995 [metadata]
Xenoglossy disk cover by Taxim, 1999 [metadata]
Xenoglossy disk cover by Wednesday, 1999 [metadata]
Zapotek disk cover by Debris, 1995 [metadata]

ladung31

C64 Covers as Naïve Art

When I visited C64 scener Goat/Laxity to pick up his C64 disk covers collection for scanning, there was one pile that he didn’t want to pass on at first. “Why one would want to preserve such primitive disk covers?”, he objected. Still, I took the covers with me, and here they are. While there had been some amazingly skillful disk covers in the previous updates, the ones presented today are admittedly not on par with them. Nevertheless, they are important to get a picture of the C64 scene beyond its “elite”. For every top swapper with loads of contacts and “0-day stuff”, there were hundreds of kids swapping with a few contacts only, dabbling in PD software and old cracks, and yet seeing themselves as part of the same scene community as the “elite”. Obviously, they wanted to have their own disk covers, like the “big ones”. Sometimes, these covers are the only product they left behind. Their somewhat clumsy designs do not need to be judged on terms of “lack of skills” – these covers can be seen as examples of naïve art, compensating the lack of adherence to any aesthetic rules with a lively will for self-expression. In fact, some of these coves look surprisingly up-to-date, and could just as well be a product of post-modern hipster aesthetics.

Accept disk cover by Greenhorn, 1993 [metadata]
• Two Acme disk covers by Hanni, 1995 [metadata1] [metadata2]
Creatures disk cover by Franco, 1992 [metadata]
Crossdome disk cover by Madrom, 1995 [metadata]
Digital Art disk cover by Xonix, 1994 [metadata]
Dinomania disk cover by Greenhorn, 1993 [metadata]
• Disk cover by JJ, 1996 [metadata]
Error 2000 disk cover by S.U.C.K., 1996 [metadata]
Logiker disk cover by Logiker, 1993 [metadata]
Nasti Boy disk cover by Nasti Boy, 1994 [metadata]
Plutonium disk cover by Greenhorn, 1993 [metadata]
Reiners Public Domain disk cover, 1994 [metadata]
Secret Lab Productions disk cover by Cosmo, 1990s [metadata]
Tiger-Crew disk cover by Greenhorn, 1990s [metadata]
Tiger-Crew disk cover by Greenhorn & Logiker, 1993 [metadata]
Tiger-Crew disk cover by Little John, 1990s [metadata]
Tiger-Disk #29 disk cover, 1996 [metadata]
World D-Sign disk cover by Fan-TC, 1994 [metadata]

ladung30

Ancient C64/Amiga Pirate Materials #2

Here is the second batch of materials provided by an anonymous contributor (click here for the first instalment). Once again, you can browse through the paper relics of the very dawn of the home computer cracking & demo cultures – fragile traces of long forgotten individuals and groups as well as of those who came to be considered as scene legends later on. Among the more unusual scans from this update is the disk cover done by the early Amiga group Warfalcons. Even though Amiga floppy disks did not technicaly need paper sleeves, Warfalcons still made a batch of these – just like the usual ones on the C64, but in 3,5″ size.  Another remarkable artifact is a letter from a Belgian Amiga swapper around 1986 – typewritten on his father’s busines card. Another example of how much early digital subcultures had to rely on analogue techniques.

• Letter from CCC/Firesoft Inc. (Belgium) to undisclosed recepient, around 1986 [metadata]
Cleveland Distribution Service sticker, mid-1980s [metadata]
Commando Frontier sticker, between 1987 and 1989 [metadata]
Dominators business card, between 1986 and 1989 [metadata]
D.S. Compware sticker sheet, between 1986 and 1987 [metadata]
Italian Spreading Service sticker, mid-1980s [metadata]
Plutonium Crackers sticker sheet, around 1986 [metadata]
Soldiers Against Protection sticker, between 1986 and 1988 [metadata]
Stars promo card, 1986 [metadata]
• The Fall Guys business card, 1987 [metadata]
The Light Circle rubber stamp, between 1986 and 1988 [metadata]
The Organized Crime sticker, between 1987 and 1988 [metadata]
The Orgasmatron Crew sticker sheet, 1987 [metadata]
The Warriors 1881 sticker, between 1986 and 1988 [metadata]
The Wizards sticker, around 1987 [metadata]
• Unknown cartoon cutout, mid-1980s [metadata]
Warfalcons disk cover, around 1987-1988 [metadata]

ladung28

C64 Swap Letters (Dr. Science Collection)

Today we give you some scans from the private collection of Dr. Science/Atlantis, a Swiss coder and cracker who was a member of the legendary Computer Freaks Association in the late 1980s and is still active in the C64 scene. Apart from some neat disk covers and CFA’s official greeting list, the probably most exciting part of this installment are the letters Dr. Science received from fellow sceners in the late 1980s and early 1990s. The letters are exemplary for the global networks built by the scene already back then – even this small sample includes correspondents from countries such as Australia, Finland, and Norway. Furthermore, the letter from Snap demonstrates how group members conducted collaborative work on demo productions before email and IRC. Expect more scans from Dr. Science’s collection in the near future!

Peter Venkman/Mega Industries business card, early 1990s [metadata]
Fairlight disk cover by Hobbit, 1990 [metadata]
Trance disk cover by Twist, 1993 [metadata]
X-Factor disk cover by Brady, 1990 (unfolded scan) [metadata]
Computer Freaks Association greeting list, 1990 [metadata]

Letters:

• Agemixer to Dr. Science, 15 June 1995 [metadata]
• Boss to Dr. Science, 19 December 1989 [metadata]
• Cruze to Dr. Science, 19 February 1992 [metadata]
• Fake to Dr. Science, early 1990s [metadata]
• Snap to Dr. Science, December 1993 [metadata]

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C64 Disk Covers (Fzool Collection #3)

Here we go with another portion of Fzool‘s vast collection of paper artifacts from the mid-1990s C64 demoscene. This time it’s disk covers – used to store 5,25″ floppy disks, but also exchanged among sceners as a commodity of its own, as can be seen with these covers, copied on A4 sheets and “swapped” by sceners without actually cutting them out. “Cover designer” was a proper scene “profession” at that time, and there are a few stunning pieces of work among these covers.

Attitude #1 disk cover by Zapotek, 1999 [metadata]
Avantgarde disk cover by Cat, 1995 [metadata]
Bioblech disk cover by Jak T Rip, 1997-1998 [metadata]
Bizarre disk cover by Brainsmasher, 1998 [metadata]
Centrax disk cover by Serio, 1997 [metadata]
Colitt/De-Koder disk cover by Zapotek, 1999 [metadata]
Cucumbeer disk cover by Serio, 1997 [metadata]
Deus Ex Machina disk cover by Junkie, 1999 [metadata]
• Untitled disk cover by Comanche, 1995 [metadata]
• Untitled disk cover by Wednesday, 1998 [metadata]

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Mixed Demoscene Stuff From Se7en

Once again, Se7en scanned some things which he accumulated during his long-standing demoscene career: Stickers, disk covers, flyers, and some weirder things like “demoparty dollars” and a Breakpoint sticker produced by a hotel. Enjoy!

Birdhouse Projects sticker, 2000s [metadata]
Brainfart “Prost!” sticker, 2000s [metadata]
Breakpoint 2009 dollars [metadata]
Breakpoint 2010 hotel sticker [metadata]
Crest “Deus Ex Machina” sticker, 2000 [metadata]
• Disk cover for Extend‘s “Der Gümmel” demo, 2006 [metadata]
Hitmen disk cover by Stone, 1996 [metadata]
Hitmen sticker sheets, 1996 [metadata]
Replay Copy Convention 2005 flyer [metadata]
ROLE disk cover by SID, 1990 [metadata]

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C64 Sleeves & Stickers

Once again, we received some byproducts of hedning‘s C64 excavations: two stickers by the 1980s cracking group “Software of Sweden”, plus a number of C64 disk covers from the late 1980s to the mid-1990s. The disk sleeve by Case/Energy is a particular beauty – hand-drawn exclusively for his swapping partner and not just a photocopied semi-mass-product like most scene disk covers, and looking very “timeless” in a way.

Software of Sweden sticker, ~1987-1989 [metadata]
Software of Sweden sticker (personalised), ~1987-1989 [metadata]
• Disk sleeve by Case/Energy, 1992 [metadata]
Crazy disk cover by Logoboy(?), 1990s [metadata]
Extend disk cover by Electric, 1990s [metadata]
Paragon disk cover by Hellraiser, ~1989-1991 [metadata]
Rock’n Role rubber-stamped disk sleeve by T.O.XIC, 1991 [metadata]
ROLE disk cover by Kirk, 1989 [metadata]
• “Puzzled” disk cover for Shape by Lord Red, 1994 [metadata]
Trance disk cover by unknown, ~1989-1990 [metadata]
Triad disk cover by Guran, 1992 [metadata]

tuerks

Tuerk’s Cracker Incorporation

There’s one artifact in our anonymous contributor’s collection which is so unusual that it’s worth dedicating a single post to. On first sight, it’s rather inconspicuous: a 5,25″ C64 disk sleeve from 1987, looking like many others. In fact, while browsing through a disk box, one could mistake it for a random commercial software sleeve – there are no fancy stickers, no scribbling, no graffiti sketches or anything else that normally makes a scene disk cover stand out. However, the inscription, TUERK’S CRACKER INCORPORATION, immediately reveals the sleeve’s subcultural origins. And makes it intriguing in several aspects.

First of all, unlike the overwhelming majority of scene disk covers, this sleeve is industrially produced. It’s made of thick cardboard with a shimmery bronze surface. One can only speculate how expensive it must have been to get the sleeves produced and how a cracker group could afford it. Perhaps, given that boundaries between crackers and small-scale commercial piracy in the mid-1980s were rather vague, and selling cracked games was not necessarily frowned upon, the group made more than just pocket money by providing paying customers with software. And thus they could not only afford fancy sleeves, but actually needed them: since competition on the black market was big, it was important to achieve customer retention by building trust. And trust could be achieved by disk sleeves that looked just as slick as the commercial ones.

Secondly, the back side is particularly interesting. Handling tips for disks were a typical attribute of commercially produced disk sleeves. These, however, were apparently not just copied. The partially awkward English hints towards the fact that they must have been written by the crackers themselves – who seem to have professed quite a sentimental relationship to their magnetic media. If handled wrongly or even given “dirty looks”, the disks might “become offended”, or even worse, suffer “amnesia or madness”. Obviously there’s quite some humour in these lines, but given the prices for good floppy disks in the mid-1980s, a more-than-careful attitude towards floppies is not completely off the hook.

There is not much known about Tuerk’s Cracker Incorporation (TCI). According to CSDb, the group was based in Germany and produced a number of cracks between 1984 and 1986. A search for “tuerk” on scrolltexts.com reveals that TCI were not mere “local lamers” – they were embedded into the (inter)national cracking circuit and were greeted by major groups such as Alpha Flight and Future Projects. TCI’s most likely founder was a swapper going by the name of The Tuerk. According to CSDb, he was a Turkish guy called Tural, hailing from Izmir but living in Frankfurt am Main, Germany. Migrants in the early German cracking scene were not completely unheard of, but they were still rather rare. Home computers were a predominantly middle-class commodity, out of reach for children of migrant labourers. 1980s sociological studies on teenage home computer users in Germany point out the very low percentage of migrant children amongst “computer kids”. How did Tural come to call a C64 his own? How did he get into the scene? What was his standing within this predominantly white, middle-class community? We don’t know, but we would be keen to find out. If you know more about Tuerk’s Cracking Incorporation, were a member, or even are The Tuerk himself, please get in touch.

High-quality scans of the sleeve, complete with metadata, can be downloaded here.

PS: After this post went online, Sim/ex-Razor 1911 suggested in a comment on social networks that the strange wording in the disk handling tips may stem from direkt word-for-word translation from Turkish to English.